PVF::WORKSHOPS

On May 9, 10 and 11 we organize workshops for visual researchers. There are several afternoon workshops on May 9 and a two-day training on May 10 and 11.

PV::IMPACT - May 9, 13:30h-17:30h, Meeting room

PV::ART/RESEARCH - May 9, 13:30h-17:30h, Koer Cafe

PV::EDITING - May 9, 13:30h-17:30h, Big hall

PV::PRODUCTION - May 10-11, 9h-18h, Meeting room *UGENT DOCTORAL SCHOOLS SPECIALIST COURSE*

The number of participants per workshop is limited, so make sure you register in time. The 9 May afternoon workshops are open to everyone. For the 10-11 May PV::PRODUCTION workshop, all remaining slots are reserved for PhD students of the Ghent University Doctoral Schools of Social & Behavioral Sciences, and Arts, Humanities & Law.

There is no registration fee.

info@participatoryvideofestival.com 

 

PV::IMPACT

13:30h-17:30h, 9 May, Meeting room

How do you generate impact with your PV project? During this hands-on and interactive workshop we reflect on the possible impact of a PV project in relation to its desired outcome, target audience and use of different formats. We start from participants' video-materials and reflect and work on them. You will also get an inspiring overview of other possible formats, impact-strategies, target audiences, etc. 

This workshop will be hosted by impact producer Céline Broeckaert from TIMESCAPES. Among other things, Céline has worked on the impact campaign of THE INVISIBLE CITY [KAKUMA] of Lieven Corthouts, about the refugee camp Kakuma in Kenia. 

PV::ART/RESEARCH 

13:30h-17:30h, 9 May, Koer Cafe

What happens when making SENSE suddenly becomes MAKING sense? Introducing an aesthetically inspired sensorial, qualitative apparatus for the analysis of sense data.

How can we generate and analyze knowledge through arts based research (ABR)? During this interactive workshop art meets research and participants are moved into practical exercises to make sense out of (self-generated) visual data. Arts based research (ABR) is a methodology in which the expressive qualities of forms are used to convey meaning and it has successfully been used in a variety of different disciplines. In many cases the art is considered the ‘data’ or ‘the vehicle for the dissemination of research findings’. It is now more common for qualitative researchers to collect images, sounds or rubbish, instead of generating interview or observation data. In addition, there is a growing interest in the use of creative types of research dissemination that complement or replace the traditional written research report; a drama or dance performance, an exhibition of images, pop-up installations or multimedia, visual representations. We have come to challenge many of the conventions that originally steered the international qualitative research agenda. However, in analytically approaching these data, scholars might not have gone far enough in exploring what the arts could offer in terms of making sense of sense data. We remain overwhelmingly traditional in our search for meaning, focussing on the storylines behind pictures and creations, rather than approaching them ‘from within’.

In this interactive workshop we will experiment with a sensorial, qualitative apparatus for image data-analysis that might help us to see what is in the picture itself. In some participants, an aesthetically inspired analytical gaze will create the kind of inconvenience inherent in walking the thin line between art and science from a transdisciplinary research perspective. The first part of this workshop will cover worked examples of how we, as social and behavioural scientists, have used and analysed visuals and 3D creations in place-based qualitative research. During the second part of the workshop we move you into a practical exercise of applying a sensorial analytical apparatus, inspired by American pragmatist John Dewey, to make sense out of a set of (self-generated) visual or tactile data.

This workshop will be hosted by Karin Hannes. She is associate professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences (social research methodology group) of KU Leuven. Her main research interest is in developing, applying, and refining approaches to qualitative research. She is most known for her academic contributions in the area of qualitative evidence synthesis. On a primary research level, she has been focusing on the use and further development of arts-based, place-based and multi-sensory research methods in the context of public health, social-cultural and social welfare practices.

PV::EDITING

13:30h-17:30h, 9 May, Big hall

Afternoon workshop on participatory video editing for social scientists. This workshop is recommended for researchers with little or no video editing capabilities. Its aim is to offer researchers that experiment with video methodologies in their research the opportunity to acquire comprehensive post-production skills in a small group setting. Moreover, the focus will lie on techniques on how to edit in a participatory way.

This workshop will be hosted by Spectacle, an award-winning independent production company specialising in documentary, community-led, investigative journalism and participatory media. As well as undertaking production, documentation and community engagement commissions, Spectacle provides facilities to independent filmmakers, runs short & sharp training courses and community based media workshops. The workshop is led by Mark Saunders, a professional filmmaker with decades of industry and teaching experience.

PV::PRODUCTION

9h-18h, 10-11 May, Meeting room

2 day workshop on video production for social scientists. This video production course for social scientists is a two-day accessible introduction to digital filmmaking techniques, designed specifically for social scientists who are interested in using video within their research and want a fast way to acquire the skills necessary to do this. The course is suitable for complete beginners and people with basic video skills. We aim to provide all participants with a solid foundation of practical knowledge: a working understanding of digital cameras, sound recording, interview techniques, filming on location and industry language. The course is hands-on from the start of day one, with a maximum of three people to each camera set up (camera, sound, interviewer) on practical activities. The course will also be community-oriented, with participants interacting with the 'Brugse Poort' neighbourhood. 

This workshop will be hosted by Spectacle, an award-winning independent production company specialising in documentary, community-led, investigative journalism and participatory media. As well as undertaking production, documentation and community engagement commissions, Spectacle provides facilities to independent filmmakers, runs short & sharp training courses and community based media workshops. The workshop is led by Mark Saunders, a professional filmmaker with decades of industry and teaching experience.

EVERYBODY WELCOME - NO REGISTRATION FEE
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EVERYBODY WELCOME - NO REGISTRATION FEE